Tapioca Dumplings : Sakoo Sai Moo

I am unsure how many times I have shared Thai street food recipes with you, but I am sure I haven’t yet shared this popular savoury appetizer named ‘Sakoo Sai Moo’.

Sakoo Sai Moo is a steamed tapioca ball filled with seasoned minced pork, sweet pickled radish and peanuts. It is served with green lettuce, coriander, fresh chilli and topped with fried garlic. The dish is a popular snack in Thailand and found at street stalls and in markets.

Traditionally this dish is made with sago starch (hence the name sakoo, which is Thai for sago), but these days tapioca is more commonly used as a substitute. 

The dish is a perfect food for a family gathering. Everyone can help prepare it or it can make ahead of time, which makes this dish ideal for serving at a party.

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Asian Style Braised Beef with Rice | Khow Nua Ob

In this post I want to share with you my recipe of khow nua ob, aka Asian style braised beef with rice. You may not see this dish often in Thai restaurants and that is among the reasons I want to share it with you.

Asian style braised beef is cooked using a similar method to the European style, but with added Asian herbs and spices like cinnamon and star anise, and the most commonly used
Thai pastes featuring garlic, pepper and coriander roots.

For the beef cut you can use varieties such as chuck, gravy, casserole, ribs etc. The cooking method can also be adjusted and includes slow cook, braising on a stove, pressure cooking or using a cast iron pot.

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Fried sweet potato balls: Kanom Kai nok kra ta

If you have been to Thailand and walked along the street you know that you can diverse foods for breakfast, lunch and dinner, along with an array of snacks at any time of the day or night.
These street food snacks are something I miss about Thailand. Even though I cook a lot each day, when I suddenly feel like a particular dish I miss just walking out the front of the home or office and buying it freshly made with the original taste.
I admit that I was a frequent buyer of street food snacks, but among all the available choices there is one snack that I really like called “Kanom Kai nok kra ta”, a form of fried sweet potato balls. I have previously posted this recipe on my blog, but that was a while ago and my instructions have improved. Please enjoy my favorite snack, with a clearer video and an enhanced recipe.

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BBQ Pork (Moo Phing)

Among the good things about living in Thailand is finding food on almost any street corner at any time of the day or night. The food is not only delicious, it is also plentiful and cheap.
I think we are spoilt in having such easy access to Thai food in Thailand, but living abroad does not stop me from having delicious street food. Here is one of my favorite street food dishes that I want to share with you this time.
The dish is grilled pork skewers with sticky rice (ข้าวเหนียวหมูปิ้ง), and it is one of my all time favourites.
I make this dish quite often at home, but I have to be hornest – I still can’t get it to taste as good as the grilled pork sold in Thailand!

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Mongolian beef

This is Mongolian beef, which is super easy to cook and really tasty. This is among our favourite family beef dishes that I want to share with you . I used rump steak, but sirloin, flank and even chuck steak are great options I hope you enjoy the video, and if you make it don’t forget to tag, mention or send me a photo. Happy cooking.

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Sen mee Pad See ew


Hi everyone and welcome back. In my last post I mentioned that sen mee (thin rice vermicelli noodle) can be used in a soup, as a stir fry, and in salad. This time I will show you how to use sen mee to create the famous Thai stir fried noodles dish, Pad see ew.
According to Wikipedia pad see ew, sometime spelt Phat si-io, is a Chinese-influenced stir fried noodle dish that is commonly eaten in Thailand and is also popular in Thai restaurants around the world.
The name of the dish translates to “fried (with) soy sauce” and it is very similar to the char kway teow of Singapore and Malaysia.

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