Crying Tiger

I bet many of you will arch your eyebrows when you see “crying tiger” on the menu at Thai restaurant. Do you know what crying tiger is? Why does the tiger cry?
Crying tiger (Sua Rong Hai: เสือร้องไห้) is an Isaan beer snack that is famous though out Thailand and now worldwide. The dish is sliced grilled beef served alongside dried chilli, tamarind dipping sauce (Nam jim jeaw) and sticky rice.

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Pad Thai Recipe

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Hello foodies! In my blog post this month I would like to share the recipe of the best known Thai dish for foreigners. This dish is available in most Thai restaurants overseas and it is one of my most requested recipes of all time!
I’m talking about Pad Thai, which is sometimes also spelled ‘Phad Thai’. Pad Thai is a stir-fried noodle dish featuring eggs, vegetables, tofu and dried shrimp in a sweet and sour sauce with made from tamarind juice, fish sauce and palm sugar.

Crispy Rice Salad with Fermented Pork Recipe: Nam Khao

Crispy rice salad with fermented pork is known as Nam clook or Khao tod nam clook in Thai. Also known as Nam khao in Lao, the dish features deep fried red curry rice balls mixed with basic Thai seasoning ingredients. These ingredients include fish sauce, lime juice, chilli, fried peanuts, sliced ginger, chopped coriander, spring onion and pork skin. Of course there is always the most special ingredient, fermented pork.

This dish is among the most famous rice dishes available from street vendors in Thailand. Outside Thailand I have seen the dish more frequently in Lao restaurants than in Thai restaurants. Many people consider the dish as an appetiser, but for me it could also be the perfect main dish.
Nam clook has a nice balance of spicy, salty, and sour with a wonderful texture of crispness from the rice, peanut and dried chilli. The dish is best served alongside fresh salad leaves such as betel leaf and lettuce. Continue reading “Crispy Rice Salad with Fermented Pork Recipe: Nam Khao”

Fermented Fish Dip: Pla Rah Sub

How can I call myself an Isaan kid if I do not blog about one of the most significant ingredients in Isaan cooking? Some of you might already know what I’m talking about. If not, I will give you more hints. This ingredient is made from fish and is famous for its smell.
I am talking about fermented fish, known as pla rah in Thai and pa daek in Lao.

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Grilled Banana with Coconut Cream Caramel

Banana trees are humble trees that play a role in many occasions in Thai life. For example, you may remember at my sister’s wedding there was a platter decorated with beautiful folded banana leaves included in the ceremony. Also, when people build a new house, a banana tree is placed to decorate the major pole. Do you know a Thai famous festival is “Loi Krathong”, a festival of lights to pay respect to the river on a full moon night in 12th month? Krathong are made from a piece of banana trunk decorated with flowers, banana leaves, candle and incense sticks.

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Guest blogger: Suphaluck Ongcharoen

“My happiness is being in the kitchen in my free time” said my guest, Supaluck Ongcharoen (Jum).
Please join me in welcoming my first ever guest blogger who has similar life experiences to mine. Born and raised in Thailand, she is an expat in Australia and, most importantly, shares a passion for food and cooking.
Let have a chat and try her chicken mussaman curry recipe – Charinya

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Khow tom mud

Steamed sticky rice with banana in banana leaves (Khow tom mud) is a dessert that you can come across very easily in Thailand. The original recipe requires wrapping in banana leaves, but living here banana leaves are not always available and are expensive. As a substitute I use baking paper. The downside is that you lose the aromatic smell of banana leaves, but it is still good enough and I enjoy it immensely.

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Tom Yum Chicken


This post shows you how to create the classic Thai dish of tom yum. In this dish you will find herbs such as lemongrass and kaffir lime ganlagal. There are two varieties of Tom yum, the creamy and the clear, with the clear version featured below. Spicy and oozing heat, this soup is the perfect winter warmer for those who live in cooler climates.

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A Traditional Thai Isaan Wedding

I recently went back to Thailand for my little sister’s wedding so I would like to take this opportunity to share my Thai Isaan traditional wedding with you.
The wedding was held at our home town in Chaiyaphum, a small province in Northeast Thailand (Isaan) where both my sister and I were born and raised and where our parents and relatives liveWe decided to do it the old way in which we prepared as much as we could ourselves instead of paying a wedding organiser or catering business. I think this way is more significant and memorable.